Window to the Past

Old Delphos News

By BOB HOLDGREVE


Delphos Honey Industry Improvement

A substantial improvement in the Delphos honey industry is being made at the home of Carl Landwehr, East Second street.

A large honey house is nearing completion at that location and will provide a central plant for three Delphos beekeepers. A.E. Weger, Carl Landwehr and S.H. Wahmhoff, who are joining in the erection of the building.

The building is a two-story structure, being 24 x 40 feet. The extracting machinery, which the three men own jointly, will be installed on the first floor.

The second floor will be used for storage of bee supplies. An elevator will be installed to facilitate handling of the supplies.

Delphos Herald, May 26, 1936


Delphos Library Has Serious Financial Problem

A serious financial problem will be considered by the board at this meeting. To be considered, will it be possible to keep the library open or to close it until funds are provided.

The support comes from the intangible taxes and is supposed to be received from Allen and Van Wert counties.

Van Wert county is supplying nothing in the way of financial support, and has not been lending support for several years past, turning all money for library purposes over to the Brumback library at Van Wert.

Allen County is now declining to lend any help because no money has been received from Van Wert County.

It is likely that a delegation from the board will visit the auditors of both counties to urge that the needed finances be provided.

Delphos Herald, Jan. 6, 1936


Gramm Motors Has 243 Unfilled Orders

Prospects of a large and growing business for Gramm Motors, Inc., are seen in repeated orders, especially from the export department.

The fact that the business is steadily improving and that the greatest production in the history of the local plant may be expected within a few months from the number of orders received. The company has 243 unfilled orders on the books. (Remember, this is during the great depression. R.H.)

Since the development of the new models for export trade, orders for samples of these have been sent in by the expert department. The initial order was for 25 sample trucks. This order was doubled last Friday and on Tuesday the order was again doubled, making the total order now 100 sample trucks for export trade.

The force for the local plant will be considerably augmented within about thirty days, the time required to get materials on hand for the large orders.

Delphos Herald, Apr. 17, 1930


Wrecking Framework on Old Canal Bridges

Nathan Leff, of Delphos, (local scrap dealer, R.H.) was given the contract by Allen and Van Wert county commissioners for the wrecking of the overhead framework of the Second and Third street canal bridges. Workmen started at the Third Street bridge Thursday. Removing the counter-balance weights there is no small task. These are sheet-iron boxes filled with many tons of concrete. While the work is going rather slowly, they expect little difficulty at the Second street bridge.

Delphos Herald, May 31, 1930


Water Works Trustees Advertise For Bids

The Water Works Trustees are advertising for bids for furnishing a new air lift, including compressor with regulator and well devices, guaranteed to elevate to the surface, 300,000 gallons of water every 10 hours. The present lift is too small for the volume of water used, and the improvement is absolutely necessary.

Delphos Herald, July 28, 1899


A Lima man and wife drove into Delphos Sunday to visit a friend on Seventh Street, and when they were ready to leave, their horse came tangled up in the harness and had a high old time. The harness was badly broken.


A few nights since, someone entered the ice house of Fisher & Haller on North Main street, and stole and carted off a quantity of ice.


A little son of Ignatius Neidecker, North Scott Street, came as close to dying and still lives as he probably ever will again. The warm weather induces sweltering humanity to prepare ice cream, lemonade and other cooling delicacies, but the making of ice cream at the Neidecker home, nearly resulted in a death.

Mr. Neideckerís little son ate two large dishes of ice cream in a very short time and was gasping for breath. The ice cream caused a temporary paralysis of the solar pluxus, and caused great difficulty breathing. His body was cold and he was unconscious for some time. It was with difficulty that a physician saved his life.

Delphos Herald, July 28, 1899


Graves of Veterans Decorated

Memorial Day was observed in the usual manner in Delphos Friday.

Members of the American Legion with the help of the local boy scouts, visited the two local cemeteries, Friday morning and in each, placed flags on the graves of all veterans of the Civil War, Spanish-American war and the World War, removing the old flags.

This was the only formal observance of the day in Delphos. Flags were flown in both the residences and business districts of Delphos.

Delphos Herald, May 31, 1930


Local Scouts on Trip to Kentucky

A party of twelve Delphos Boy Scouts and leaders left Delphos Friday morning on a trip to Kentucky.

This trip was designed for all active first class Scouts. Nine boys qualified for the trip. They were Robert Rozelle, Sanford Cattels, Eugene Gladen, William Deffenbaugh, Urban Schaffner, Clair Rozelle, Charles Hume, Anthony Stepleton and Harold Rozelle.

The boys were accompanied by William Gladen, scoutmaster of Troop Five, Bernard Perry, superintendent of Ft. Jennings schools, and A.J. Laudick, local Scout commissioner. Each of these is driving an automobile, pulling a trailer to haul equipment. They are spending the nights in tents and will visit Mammoth Cave, Lincolnís birthplace, Old Kentucky Home and other points of interest in Ohio and Indiana.

Delphos Herald, May 31, 1930


City Buys Back Old Fire Truck

Delphos is again the owner of the old fire truck which has been doing duty here for a number of years past.

Service Director H.D. Bickel has purchased this truck from the Seagrave company, to whom it was sold at the time of the purchase of the new truck. The price paid by the city is $125.

All the equipment will be taken off the truck and a derrick will be mounted on it. The truck will be used for pulling well casings at the waterworks plant. The service director is of the opinion that it will aid greatly in keeping the city water supply in good condition.

Delphos Herald, May 28, 1930


Temporary Quarters for Busch Bros.

The stock of the Busch Brothers store is being moved into a temporary building which has been fitted up for this purpose at the north side of the ground on which the firm is to erect its new building.

The firm will continue in business while the work on the new building goes forward and the building will be constructed around the temporary store.

The work of tearing down the building in which the store has been located will be started within the next day or two.

The excavation for the basement has been completed at the rear of the building. This basement is to be deeper than ordinary and will be used for storage space.

The new building will be a two-story structure and will cover the entire space between the Commercial Bank and Odenwellers.

Delphos Herald, May 27, 1930


Benefits of Growing Soybeans

The benefits to be derived from growing soybeans was the topic of an address, delivered by Mr. McMillan of the Central Sugar Company, Decatur, Ind. at a meeting of the Delphos Kiwanis Club held at the Beckman Hotel Tuesday night. Mr. McMillan stressed the possibility of greater profits for the farmers in growing soybeans in the United States and of the many uses to which soybean by-products are being used.

The speaker said that the soybean is native to China, and for centuries the Chinese have been putting it to many uses because of lack of transportation.

The beans there are used for soup, as green beans and in many other ways as food. They take the place of meat to a great extent in China. Cheese is manufactured from soybean milk and keeps well. Soybean milk is used in place of cowís milk and is delivered door to door. The beans are ground into flour and used for making bread.

Soybeans were not grown to any extent in this country until 1930 when it was first used here as an emergency hay crop.

Soybean oil is now being manufactured in a large extent in the U.S. It is used by soap manufacturers and in rubber products and linoleum and paint manufacturings.

Delphos Herald, Mar. 27, 1935


Movie Men Take Pictures of Leslie Peltier

Pathe News men were in Delphos Friday afternoon taking pictures of Leslie Peltier, local astronomer who has again achieved fame for discovery of another comet.

Pictures of Mr. Peltier at his drafting table at the Delphos Bending Company, where he spends his working hours during the day, were taken first. The movie cameramen then went to the Peltier home east of the Auglaize river to take pictures of Mr. Peltier at his home-built observatory where he has made his astronomical observations and discoveries.

Delphos Herald, May 22, 1936


Local Instruction in Temperance at Public School

Thursday and Friday, January 16 and 17 will be observed in the Delphos Public schools, along with the other schools of the state, as days for the carrying out of a temperance day program in accordance with the state laws in this matter.

The statues providing for this instruction reads as follows:

"The Friday nearest the sixteenth day of January of each year shall be set apart as a day on which those in charge of the public schools shall spend at least two hours time in carrying out a temperance day program as prepared by the superintendent of public instruction; information relative to the history of the temperance movement and of the physiological value of temperance shall be given the pupils. Such a day shall be known as temperance day."

The Delphos schools have received instructions from the state Department of Education calling attention to this provision of the law and requesting that it be carried into effect.

There will be no special program but the instruction required will be given during regular class periods in the class instructed by Robert Day, Frank E. Kurth, Miss Opal Snyder, Miss Mabel Rogers and Miss Pullick.

Delphos Herald, Jan. 8, 1936


His Grandfather and Great-grandfather were Delphos Physicians

Dr. Thomas Reul, Lima, grandson of Mrs. Fannie Reul, West Second Street, is carrying on a family tradition by adapting medicine as a career. The Reuls are a pioneer Delphos family. His grandfather, Dr. Charles Reul, practiced medicine in Delphos for years. Dr. Rudolph Reul, great-grandfather of Dr. Thomas Reuhl, was a pioneer physician of Delphos.

It is likely that he will study abroad following his internship.

The Harry Reul family left Delphos about fourteen years ago and is well-known here.

Delphos Herald, Mar. 18, 193


Special Train To Landeck

Arrangements have been made for the picnic to be held at Landeck by the members of the Catholic Church there, Sunday, July 13. The event will be held in the Luersman grove, near the Landeck station, and arrangements have been made for entertaining several thousand people. The grove has been placed in readiness for the big event. It is expected that a big crowd will come from Dayton to Delphos and board the special train for Landeck. The Landeck Band will furnish music throughout the day and it is possible that the Dayton visitors will bring a musical organization. Besides the special train on the Clover Leaf, Wendell Davis and the Mueller Implent & Auto Co. will run trucks hourly to Landeck and return for the accommodation of local people who wish to visit the picnic grounds. The proceeds from the picnic will benefit the Landeck church.

The Davis auto truck will make regular trips between Delphos and Landeck Sunday.

Delphos Herald, July 12, 1913



Compiled by Robert Holdgreve
Delphos Historical Society

September 19, 2009 Delphos Herald Newspaper

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